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Hilton Als & Natalie Diaz

Thursday, February 3, 2022
7:30pm Pacific Time
Venue: Sydney Goldstein Theater

Postcolonial Love Poem is an anthem of desire against erasure. Natalie Diaz’s brilliant second collection demands that every body carried in its pages—bodies of language, land, rivers, suffering brothers, enemies, and lovers—be touched and held as beloveds.” –Graywolf Press

Poet Natalie Diaz was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for her collection Postcolonial Love Poem, a “breathtaking, groundbreaking book, an intellectually rigorous exploration of the postcolonial toll on land, love and people, as well as a call to fight back” (The Guardian). She is also the author of When My Brother Was an Aztec, winner of an American Book Award. Born in the Fort Mojave Indian Village in Needles in California, Diaz is Mojave and an enrolled member of the Gila River Indian community. After attending Old Dominion University, Diaz played professional basketball in Europe and Asia. Diaz teaches at the Institute of American Indian Arts Low Rez MFA and is the director of the Fort Mojave Language Recovery Program, where she works with the last remaining speakers of the Mojave language.

Hilton Als is an essayist and author whose work as appeared in The New Yorker since 1989 where he became a staff writer in 1994.  Als received the 2017 Pulitzer Prize in Criticism, “for bold and original reviews that strove to put stage dramas within a real-world cultural context, particularly the shifting landscape of gender, sexuality and race.”  He is the author of The Women, and White Girls, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the winner of the Lambda Literary Award for Non-fiction. His writing, regardless of form, explores race, sexuality, class, art, and American identity provocatively, exploding the boundaries of the genre in which it is contained.